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There are many opportunities for parents to find out about how well their son or daughter is progressing and about the ways in which they can support their child’s learning. These include parents' evenings and  termly Progress Reports, but we also actively encourage parents to directly contact individual teachers for further information and guidance (see staff contacts).
A typical reporting cycle for Year 7 is as follows:
 
October - Parents’ evening with personal tutor
December - Progress Check 1 sent home
February - Progress Check 2 sent home
March - Parents’ evening with subject teachers - teachers or tutors may request to see you or you can request to see a particular teacher
June - Progress Check 3 sent home
 

Monitoring and Reporting Progress

Grading System

From September 2015, the Government introduced a new grading system for GCSEs. Liskeard School and Community College use this new grading system for all years from this time (except for the students in Years 10 and 11, who are completing the legacy GCSEs). The new grading system is based on a number system from 0 to 9. We have broken these numbered grades into three parts to make our own assessment and reporting more accurate and precise as follows:

.2 = just into a grade

.5 = secure and solidly working at this grade

.8 = showing elements of the grade above

This new system is not exactly equivalent to previous systems but the below table outlines the approximate equivalency:

Click here for the grading system 

 

Target Setting

All students in Years 7 to 11 are set targets in each of their subjects. These targets are ambitious but achievable and are generated for each student based on students’ scores in the national tests at the end of Year 6 in English and maths. The targets are designed to enable students to make good progress in their learning and achievement over their five years at secondary school. The chart below shows broadly how this is calculated. Where students make even better progress than their target along the way, teachers will raise their targets to enable them to continue to aim high and achieve their full potential. In Years 7 to 9, these progress targets will be broken down into yearly targets. In Years 10 and 11, students will be given a target for the end of the Key Stage – for their GCSEs at the end of year 11.

Personalised-Pathways-Progress-Chart 

 

Reporting Progress to Parents

Throughout the year, teachers submit assessment data on each student. This data is reported back to parents through Progress Checks. Every student will receive three Progress Checks every academic year. In addition to these reports, each year group has their own Parents’ Evening where parents are invited into school to meet with their child’s subject teachers to discuss their progress. The dates of the parents’ evenings and when Progress Checks will be published can be found on the school’s calendar.

The Progress Checks show students’ current and forecast (predicted) grades against their target grades. The forecast grade will be coloured to highlight progress and a next step target will summarise the key knowledge and/or skill that needs to be mastered in order to enable that student to progress to the next grade.

Students’ attitudes to their learning is also reported on every Progress Check. Teachers score students on a scale of 1 to 4 on their application and organisation as follows:

 

1.

Attitude to Learning

 Excellent 

Application

Exceptional, positive approach to lessons. Determined to learn and pushes him or herself to achieve to best of ability. Completed homework shows high levels of independence and motivation. Keen to learn at all times.

Organisation

Arrives on time to lessons and ready to learn. Fully equipped for lessons. Always meets homework deadlines.

 

2.

Attitude to Learning

 Good 

Application

Attentive and ready to learn. Work is normally completed to a high standard. Completed homework shows commitment and some independent skills. Mostly keen to learn.

Organisation

Nearly always on time to lessons and ready. Almost always has correct equipment. Nearly always meets homework deadlines.

 

3.

Attitude to Learning

 Satisfactory 

Application

Attentive when prompted. Work is completed to a reasonable standard. Completed homework shows minimal effort and there is a need for more effort. Prepared to learn.

Organisation

Usually on time to lessons. Normally has most equipment. Meets homework deadlines often but not on occasion.

 

4.

Attitude to Learning

 Poor 

Application

Direct requests for attentiveness often required. Work is sometimes completed to a low personal standard. Homework reflects some lack of commitment and self-motivation. Too frequently made to learn.

Organisation

Late to lessons on occasion. Personal organisation of equipment and books may be a concern. Homework often not completed on time.

 

5.

Attitude to Learning

 Serious Concern 

Application

Satisfactory levels of commitment and motivation are rarely evident. Work is often incomplete or of a low personal standard. Sees learning as something forced upon them. Refuses to learn at times.

Organisation

Frequent lateness affects themselves and others. Personal organisation of equipment and books affects learning. Homework rarely or never completed on time.

 

An example of a student report is shown below:

Student-Report-Example 

 

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